Delta Is Asking Airlines to Share Their No-Fly Lists

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September 25. Delta Air Lines has 1,600 passengers on its no-fly list. United Airlines reportedly has more than 1,000 on its own banned-from-flying list. American, JetBlue, Southwest, Hawaiian and Alaskan airlines all have their own lists of DO NOT FLY.

Traditionally, airlines have always kept those lists for internal use only, meaning that a passenger who is banned on one airline could simply fly on another. But that may soon change.

Delta Air Lines is asking “other airlines to share their ‘no fly’ lists,” because, as Kristen Manion Taylor, Delta’s senior vice president of in-flight service, wrote in a memo to flight attendants, “a list of banned customers doesn’t work as well if that customer can fly with another airline.”

“Anytime a customer physically engages with intent to harm, whether in a lobby, at a gate or onboard, they are added to our permanent No Fly list,” wrote Eric Phillips, Delta’s senior vice president of charter and cargo operations, in another staff memo. “We also actively engage with local authorities to ensure these incidents are investigated and prosecuted as the law allows.”

Air rage is on the rise. So far in 2021, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) received 4,385 reports of unruly passengers. About three-quarters of incidents involved travelers who refused to comply with a federal mask mandate on board.

Source: Forbes

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79150cookie-checkDelta Is Asking Airlines to Share Their No-Fly Lists