How’s The World Doing? Follow Delta’s International Market Recovery by Geography

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July 18. Somewhat unsurprisingly, there is strong demand for travel from the United States to Europe. This is traditionally one of the strongest markets for the carrier, thanks to strong cultural, business, and tourism ties between the US and Europe.

The problem for Delta is bringing travelers from Europe to the United States. While US citizens can get back to the country just fine, the same cannot be said for bringing foreign citizens to the United States. There is currently a restriction on most foreign nationals from coming to the United States.

Delta expects its capacity to be flat in this market compared to the summer heading into September and October. This is largely because the airline expects to keep flying to its European hubs with higher frequencies, as it expects a better fall for European travel.

Latin America market can be separated into two distinct ones. First, there is the short-haul Latin America and Caribbean market, which includes Mexico. Here, according to the airline, it is exceeding 2019 levels in terms of performance. The airline expects this to continue to be a hot leisure market this fall.

In the long-haul market, however, things are very different there. Between a mix of entry restrictions and a difficult state of the virus in those markets, Delta is seeing reduced demand and, in some cases, limits on the number of passengers that can enter a country in a given day. The transpacific market includes places like Japan, South Korea, China, Australia, and New Zealand. The key in all of these markets is that travel restrictions have essentially dashed any hope of Americans visiting for the foreseeable future.

Source: Simple Flying

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69100cookie-checkHow’s The World Doing? Follow Delta’s International Market Recovery by Geography