Stormy Seas or Smooth Sailing? What Lies Ahead for the Global Cruise Industry

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April 21. After two years of navigating relentlessly choppy seas, the cruise industry — one of the sectors of tourism hardest hit by the pandemic — is forecasting significantly smoother sailing ahead.

Facing persistent pandemic pressures and increasingly urgent demands around climate action, industry innovation and adaptation has been the name of the game.

Following a 15-month-long pandemic lockdown period, ships began sputtering forward from US ports once again last summer, though not without setbacks (the CDC issued its strongest travel warning around cruise travel during December’s Omicron surge, for instance).

Finally, last month, however, the CDC removed all risk advisories around cruising for the first time in two years.

According to leading global cruise industry trade group Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA), more than 75% of its member ships have returned to service, with almost all projected to be back in the water by late summer.

CLIA forecasts passenger numbers will not only meet but exceed pre-pandemic levels by the end of 2023. And according to Cruise Industry News’ cruise ship orderbook for ocean-going vessels, nearly 40 new ships are lined up to debut this year alone, with more than 75 vessels on order through 2027.

Source: CNN Travel

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115850cookie-checkStormy Seas or Smooth Sailing? What Lies Ahead for the Global Cruise Industry